Joint Health – Vitamin C

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each week, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Joint Health – Vitamin C

Vitamin C is absolutely necessary for the production of strong collagen fibers, including those found within joint cartilage. Without adequate supplies of vitamin C, collagen fibers become weak and lose structural integrity. Mechanical failure of weakened joint cartilage can trigger joint discomfort and other joint health issues.

Data obtained from the 10-year prospective Iowa Women’s Health Study of 29,368 women aged 55 years or older when the study began indicate that among these seemingly typical older US women, the chance of maintaining healthy joint structure and function among women consuming more than twice the current RDA for vitamin C was about twice as good as that among women consuming less vitamin C.14 Consistent with this finding, other studies have found that routine daily vitamin C intakes greater than twice the current RDA enhance an individual’s ability to maintain normal joint function with age.15

Next Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Joint Health – Boswellia serrata

References:
14. Cerhan JR, Saag KG, Merlino LA, Mikuls TR, Criswell LA. Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. Am J Epidemiol 2003;157:345-354.
15. McAlindon TE, Jacques P, Zhang Y, Hannan MT, Aliabadi P, Weissman B, Rush D, Levy D, Felson DT. Do antioxidant micronutrients protect against the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis? Arthritis Rheum 1996;39:648-656.

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Tips for Better Bone Building, Part 3: Vitamin C

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each week, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Tips for Better Bone Building, Part 3: Vitamin C

Collagen is the major structural protein in bone. The proper synthesis and linking of collagen fibers requires large amounts of vitamin C. It is not surprising that nutritionists have found that the density and strength of adult bones increases as daily vitamin C intake increases.9,10 With so many other ways to benefit from a regular intake of vitamin C, why take chances with your bones?

Next Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Tips for Better Bone Building, Part 4: Phosphorus

References:
9. Macdonald HM, New SA, Golden MH, Campbell MK, Reid DM. Nutritional associations with bone loss during the menopausal transition: Evidence of a beneficial effect of calcium, alcohol, and fruit and vegetable nutrients and of a detrimental effect of fatty acids. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79:155-165.
10. Maggio D, Barabani M, Pierandrei M, Polidori MC, Catani M, Mecocci P, Senin U, Pacifici R, Cherubini A. Marked decrease in plasma antioxidants in aged osteoporotic women: Results of a crosssectional study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003;88:1523-7152.

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Vitamins, Minerals and Dental Health

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each day, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Vitamins, Minerals and Dental Health

Vitamin C
The need for vitamin C to allow the tough fibers of the gums to link together is the most famous example of the way an essential component of the diet is irreplaceable in the maintenance of human health. The recognition of this role founded the science of vitaminology. By promoting strong and healthy gums, vitamin C contributes to dental health.

Magnesium, Calcium and Vitamin D
Strong teeth require more than just strong gums – they also need strong underlying bone through which they attach to the gums and the jawbone. Of course, sound calcium and vitamin D nutrition will allow those stalwarts of bone health to foster dental longevity. In addition, it is becoming clear that there is another, underappreciated member of the dental health team – magnesium. As shown in one survey of adults, the greater the daily intake of magnesium, the better the health of the periodontal tissue.41

Next Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Vitamins, Minerals and Healthy Aging Go Hand-In-Hand

References:
41. Meisel P, Schwahn C, Luedemann J, John U, Kroemer HK, Kocher T. Magnesium deficiency is associated with periodontal disease. J Dent Res 2005;84:937-941.

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