Purity Products Vitamin D

Just thought we’d post a quick note on several of the ways to order our increasingly popular Dr. Cannell’s Advanced D.

First, we have a list of all Dr. Cannell’s Advanced D products on our website at:
Purity Products Vitamin D

Second, if you wish to “try before you buy,” we have several ways to do so:

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Vitamins and Minerals – Helping Hands of Health

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each day, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Vitamins and Minerals – Helping Hands of Health

The vitamins and essential minerals are just that – essential. They must be part of the diet every day, day after day, year after year. Long-term failure to include enough of even one vitamin or essential mineral from the diet will cause disease, cell death and tissue degeneration. Eventually, the entire body will begin to die. Obviously, this is not a scenario consistent with the goal of Healthy Aging, as deficiencies of essential minerals and vitamins are the unhealthiest way to age. In the paradigm of healthy aging, ensuring adequate intakes of these essentials is the first step. Without this essential foundation, the other pillars of healthy aging crumble fast.

By now, in this enlightened, affluent, highly-educated era, it would seem reasonable to expect that no one in the US could possibly suffer from a deficiency of a vitamin or essential mineral. Or so the US government and the American Medical Association may have you believe. Unfortunately, it just isn’t so.

According to US government data, over 90% of all adult Americans do not consume enough calcium every day to satisfy the current government-sanctioned (that is, minimal) dietary standards. The same holds true for magnesium and vitamin E. Another 75% of all US adults are deficient in copper or zinc; half are deficient in vitamin C, vitamin D or chromium; and between 10% and 15% are deficient in one or more of the B-vitamins. Amazingly, even in the face of the current epidemic of obesity, widespread nutritional deficiencies are rampant in the US. We’re eating more than ever in the history of human existence. Yet, what we’re eating more of is empty calories. Processed foods are a high percentage of the Standard American Diet (So SAD!) and these foods are devoid of many essential vitamins and minerals. So while we’re eating more, we’re not consuming enough of the essentials.

You might ask, “So what? I don’t feel unhealthy.” It’s not like we have problems with:

Gum Health (vitamin C and magnesium);
Hair Health and rough skin (B-vitamins);
Prostate Health (vitamin D, vitamin E, selenium and zinc);
Healthy Blood Sugar (chromium, magnesium and vanadium);
Bone Health (calcium, magnesium, boron, vitamin D, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K);
Memory Issues (folate/folic acid, thiamin, choline, vitamin E, selenium);
Heart Health (selenium, calcium, magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin E and vitamin D);
Periodontal Health (calcium, magnesium, vitamin C and vitamin D);
Weak Immune Systems (selenium, zinc, vitamin C and vitamin D); or
Feeling Tired (B-vitamins and magnesium).

These issues are so prevalent in our population that it’s easy not to be concerned about them. The more one thinks about them, though, the more one realizes the problems they can lead to. The irony of it all is that these areas can all be supported simply by ensuring adequate intakes of essential vitamins and minerals.

In addition to the prevention of the classically recognized nutritional deficiency diseases, healthy intakes of vitamins and minerals can do the body a world of good. A few stellar examples should make the point.

Next Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Vitamins, Minerals and Longevity

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Vitamin D and Athletic Performance

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each day, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Vitamin D – Run Faster, Jump Higher!

A little-appreciated consequence of too little vitamin D is muscle soreness that can often result in sore legs and increased discomfort while walking or even standing up. Research findings presented at a June 2006 conference on bone health indicate that vitamin D is a powerful promoter of muscle health and function in older adults and the elderly. In this study, daily dietary supplementation with 3,000 IU of vitamin D for 6 months increased lower limb muscle strength in previously vitamin D deficient elderly men and women by an average of 20% – enough to restore mobility and improve their quality of life substantially.27 We do not know if this would be increased even further if they took 5,000 IU/day. In addition, none of the supplemented subjects exhibited any signs of vitamin D toxicity after the 6 months of vitamin D supplementation and all exhibited minimization of PTH secretion, a proposed measure of vitamin D adequacy.

Keeping with this line of thought, research over several decades points to the ability of vitamin D to influence athletic performance. A recent review highlights the results of numerous studies dating back to the 1950s showing that ultraviolet light exposure improves athletic performance.1 This interesting review also suggests that athletic performance has seasonal variations, peaking at times of the year when vitamin D concentrations are naturally higher and decreasing when vitamin D levels are seasonally lower. Vitamin D administration has also been found to increase muscle strength and the percentage of Type II (fast-twitch) muscle fibers in humans. Studies in the elderly have found that vitamin D can improve balance and reaction time. Given that vitamin D is known to affect the expression of more than 1,000 genes, these findings come as no surprise.

Next Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Vitamin D’s Helper Nutrients

References:
27. Pedrosa MAC, Moreira LDF, Barros ER, Kunii I, Lazaretti-Castro M. Cholecalciferol supplementation reverts 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) insufficiency and increases lower limb muscle strength (LLMS) in elderly people living in long-stay geriatric care (LSGC) (abstract P367SA). Proceedings, International Osteoporosis Foundation World Congress on Osteoporosis, Toronto, Canada, June 2-6, 2006, pp. 132-133.
1. Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Sorenson MB, Taft TN, Anderson JJ. Athletic Performance and Vitamin D. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009; 41(5):1102- 1110.

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How Much Vitamin D Do I Need?

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each day, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
How Much Vitamin D Do I Need?

A steadily growing body of scientific research demonstrates that daily intakes of vitamin D much greater than the current RDA of 400 IU are required to minimize PTH secretion, optimize skeletal health, and perform the myriad of other functions inside the cell. For example, the results of an elaborate analysis of published research in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), indicate a clear improvement in bone health among men and women over 60 years of age who routinely consumed double the RDA (about 800 IU of vitamin D daily) compared to those who stuck to the RDA.15 In fact, the results of the Women’s Health Initiative Study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine proved that the RDA for vitamin D was no better than vitamin D deficient diets in protecting the skeleton.16 The results of another study published recently in the British Medical Journal indicate that even 800 IU daily is not enough vitamin D for every elderly person to help prevent falling and fractures.17

The best estimates available suggest that an intake of 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day is the bare minimum that should be consumed by adults who also expose themselves to full-body sun on the weekends, just to ensure that the body’s daily needs are met. A pioneer of vitamin D research, Dr. Hector F. DeLuca of the University of Wisconsin, has advised all adults to consume 2000 IU of vitamin D daily.15 However, remember studies suggest that an intake of between 3,800 IU and 5,000 IU of vitamin D3 are needed on a daily basis to achieve levels of 25(OH)D3 of 30 ng/ mL in 97.5% of people.4 Many researchers, including Dr. John J. Cannell, Director of the Vitamin D Council, have suggested that optimal levels of 25(OH)D3 for health and wellness are 50 to 80 ng/ml.2 In order to obtain these levels, most adults require a daily intake of 5,000 IU of vitamin D3. Certain individuals (those with dark skin, obese, or older) may require even more. Taking 5,000 IU of vitamin D3 on a daily basis is very safe with little, if any, risk of toxicity. It has been suggested that everyone should be periodically tested for blood levels of twenty-five-hydroxy-Vitamin D [25(OH)D] to ensure that adequate concentrations are being sustained. The first test can be performed after 2 or 3 months on a daily dose of 5,000 IU, and then periodically thereafter. This is in fact the only way to ensure that you are getting the amount of vitamin D that your body needs to function optimally. Check with your nutritionally-oriented physician or naturopathic doctor in order to assure that your 25(OH)D levels are between 50 and 80 ng/ml, the midpoint on the reference range.

Next  Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging topic:
Vitamin D – Not Just for Good-Looking Bones

References:
2. Cannell JJ, Hollis BW. Use of vitamin D in clinical practice. Altern Med Rev 2008 Mar;13(1):6-20.
4. Aloia JF, Patel M, Dimaano R, Li-Ng M, Talwar SA, Mikhail M, Pollack S, Yeh JK. Vitamin D intake to attain a desired serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1952-8.
15. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA 2005;293:2257-2264.
16. Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, Wallace RB, Robbins J, Lewis CE, Bassford T, Beresford SA, Black HR, Blanchette P, Bonds DE, Brunner RL, Brzyski RG, Caan B, Cauley JA, Chlebowski RT, Cummings SR, Granek I, Hays J, Heiss G, Hendrix SL, Howard BV, Hsia J, Hubbell FA, Johnson KC, Judd H, Kotchen JM, Kuller LH, Langer RD, Lasser NL, Limacher MC, Ludlam S, Manson JE, Margolis KL, McGowan J, Ockene JK, O’Sullivan MJ, Phillips L, Prentice RL, Sarto GE, Stefanick ML, Van Horn L, Wactawski-Wende J, Whitlock E, Anderson GL, Assaf AR, Barad D; Women’s Health Initiative Investigators. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and the risk of fractures. N Engl J Med 2006;354:669-683.
17. Porthouse J, Cockayne S, King C, Saxon L, Steele E, Aspray T, Baverstock M, Birks Y, Dumville J, Francis R, Iglesias C, Puffer S, Sutcliffe A, Watt I, Torgerson DJ. Randomised controlled trial of calcium and supplementation with cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) for prevention of fractures in primary care. BMJ 2005;330:1003 (6 pages). doi:10.1136/bmj.330.7498.1003
(http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7498/1003).

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Vitamin D, More than just a Vitamin

This is part of our ongoing The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging spotlight. Each day, we will be posting some of the great information that’s packed into our book, The Best Kept Secrets to Healthy Aging.

Today’s topic:
Vitamin D – More than just a Vitamin

The discovery of vitamin D early in the 20th century eventually led to several important discoveries that have changed how nutritionists look at vitamins. Most importantly, under ideal circumstances of sun exposure, the human body can make all the vitamin D it needs without help from the diet. But, the amount of vitamin D produced in the body depends on the length of time and the amount of skin exposed to ultraviolet B sunlight – too little sunlight, too little vitamin D. If sunlight exposure is inadequate, vitamin D becomes a dietary essential that must be consumed in order to satisfy the body’s needs. More recently, evidence has come to light regarding the widespread deficiency of vitamin D. While the majority of individuals deficient in this vitamin live in northern latitudes, where sun exposure is limited except in the summer, a number of studies report vitamin D-deficient populations in states and countries where sunshine is intense year-round. An important factor seems to be that the darker an individual’s skin, the longer the sun exposure necessary to produce vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency is common in African Americans for this reason. Research also suggests that vitamin D deficiency may be common in India, a country where there is plenty of sunshine. What these facts tend to point to is sun-avoidance, even in the tropics, is contributing to this global epidemic of vitamin D deficiency. Dietary factors can impact vitamin D nutrition, as can possibly several factors that limit the conversion of vitamin D in the body to its active form.

Whether vitamin D is consumed through a fortified dairy food, is part of a dietary supplement or is synthesized in the skin in response to exposure to sunlight, these forms of vitamin D are inactive. They must undergo a 2-step activation process: step 1 occurs in the liver (converting vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 or 25OHD3), step 2 is performed by kidneys and multiple other organs in the body to convert 25OHD3 to the most active form of the vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Although the rate of the renal activation step is controlled by other hormones in response to fluctuations in plasma calcium concentration, at 25OHD32 levels achieved by most modern humans, both the hepatic step and the production of 1,25(OH)2D3 in multiple other organs depends directly on the amount of vitamin D produced by the skin or added to the blood through the diet. Only when 25OHD3 levels exceed 50 ng/ml, a level only achieved when adults take 5,000 IU per day or sunbathe regularly, does the metabolism of Vitamin D become similar to other such hormones, controlled with feedback to limit production.

Although called a “vitamin,” vitamin D actually is probably better characterized as a “prohormone” that becomes a full-blown hormone after the sequential activation steps. Vitamin D also differs from most other vitamins in another important respect. Typically, vitamins assist other molecules (usually enzymes) to do their jobs. In contrast, vitamin D does not participate in any other molecules’ functions. Instead, vitamin D interacts with messenger molecules to signal to a cell’s DNA that it needs to switch on or off a particular cell function.

Traditionally it has been believed that the functions controlled by vitamin D all involved the absorption of calcium and phosphorus by the intestinal tract and the regulation of the amounts of these minerals in the blood. These tasks require fully activated vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) to help control the rates of dietary calcium absorption, bone formation and resorption in the skeleton and excretion of calcium by the kidney.

Beyond this, when 1,25(OH)2D3 is made in tissues, it becomes an autonomous activator of more than 1,000 genes, thus vitamin D influences processes in organ systems throughout the body.1 Since the functions of vitamin D in multiple tissues are autonomous, it has as many mechanisms of actions as genes it regulates.2 These autonomous hormone actions, termed autocrine or inside the cell, extend far beyond the regulations of calcium and phosphorus levels, and these exciting functions of vitamin D are just now beginning to be untapped by researchers. As a nutrient, vitamin D has the potential to be a game-changer and, with more research, the vast reach of this health-giving essential nutrient will begin to be realized.

Tomorrow’s topic: The Sun, the Skin and Vitamin D

References:
1.Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Sorenson MB, Taft TN, Anderson JJ. Athletic Performance and Vitamin D. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009; 41(5):1102- 1110.
2. Cannell JJ, Hollis BW. Use of vitamin D in clinical practice. Altern Med Rev 2008 Mar;13(1):6-20

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